NHL’s biggest comeback… the fans!

The Green Men with Prime Minister Stephen Harper and Heritage Minister James Moore. // Photo courtesy of The Green Men

The Green Men with Prime Minister Stephen Harper and Heritage Minister James Moore. // Photo courtesy of The Green Men

Across from Rogers Arena in Vancouver, in a Costco parking lot, two silky green figures exit a car and make their way to the rink. Known to many in the hockey world as Sully and Force, the Green Men remain faceless and anonymous to everyone in the sporting world.

As the first inductees into ESPN’s Hall of Fans, the Vancouver Canucks supporters are unquestionably two of the most dedicated fans in any of the 30 National Hockey League arenas.

But like many, Sully and Force, who keep their real identities unknown to the hockey world, were angry and frustrated last September when NHL owners decided to lock out their players.  Read more of this post

Getting #LdnOnt involved

London Free Press news editor Greg Van Moorsel's twitter profile. // Photo by Andrew Forbes

London Free Press news editor Greg Van Moorsel’s twitter profile. // Photo by Andrew Forbes

They are short thoughts – 140-character messages shared with anyone who decides to follow you. These tweets, brief as they may be, are making their way into the political arena.

Recently, Londoners have seen local issues take precedence on the social media platform – with the city’s tax increase and a councillor’s derogatory comments at a council meeting generating a lot of discussion amongst Twitter users.

But how much meaning can these short messages carry?  Read more of this post

Bookstore busy all year long

Inside the University Community Centre bookstore early one Friday afternoon, employees stand behind the information desk working on computers. Shoppers meander through the aisles amid the sound of clicking keyboards.

“Jane Doran,” said one of the employees looking around the store, “she’s around here somewhere. She’s always busy.”

“Jane, can you come to the information desk please,” the worker said over the store’s intercom.  Read more of this post

Used books connect readers to the past

Every morning, Tyler Smith opens the door to a cultural storehouse.

“We’re a place that people come to feel a sense of community. It’s a place of conversation – a place of ideas,” said Smith, manager of City Lights Bookshop.

This sense of community helps maintain the success of used bookstores and withstand the evolution of ebook technology, Smith said.

City Lights has been a part of London’s downtown since 1975.  Inside, books are stacked on shelves from one end of the store to the other – sometimes reaching as high as the ceiling.

Read more of this post

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